2017 20. The Women of the Rose

By Dorothy Gibbons

Rating:  4 out of 5

I became acquainted with Dr. Dixie Mellilo and The Rose in 1995.  I used to donate to them regularly, but have gotten out of that habit.  I need to get back into it.

This book is pretty well written by someone who is not specifically a writer.  The Rose’s history is pretty fascinating to me, and what this book has to teach about the realities of health care for the poor and uninsured is eye-opening.

2017 18. The Letter

By Kathryn Hughes

Rating: 3 out of 5

This kept my attention most of the time. It is like multiple books in one, and they aren’t deftly blended at the end.

A large portion of it is almost unbearably sad. Then, that storyline ends abruptly.

The last part and particularly the final resolution is contrived and cheesy.

2017 17. Haven

By Ruth Gruber

Rating:  5 out of 5

This is a wonderful, wonderful book about refugees from Hitler and all the behind-the-scenes political wrangling it took to get them to America and to stay in America, written by a fantastic eye-witness to the events.  The author lived a great life and just died this past November, at the age of 105.  She became the youngest Phd in the world before going on to a long life of serving others.  Highly recommended reading